Category: special needs

13 Questions to ask to ensure you are an inclusive setting.

This is primarily SEN focused but can any truly inclusive setting should be able to use this as a checklist. Before you start looking at strategies or labeling a child’s actions as challenging ask yourself these questions. They could form an initial discussion with your team. If you cannot answer Yes to the first 13

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There comes a time: The crisis facing our most vulnerable children.

There are many many children out there who are crying out for help. There are many dedicated, enthusiastic, creative and compassionate people who are desperate to help. These people need help, we are increasingly facing highly complex issues that very few educational professionals are equipped to deal with. I am writing this as a teacher but I know there are CAMHS workers, social workers and support staff throughout the country who are feeling like this.

Essential Star Wars Toys for Inclusive Teachers

Seeing as my most popular post is Star Wars quotes I thought why not tap into the force and write a post on Using star wars toys, games and lightsabers in the classroom. All these have links to the products but my favourite way to gather resources is to ask fellow Jedi teachers/friends to remember my little rebel alliance when having a pre-Christmas clear out.

Inclusive Teacher: My Little Worry Book

I needed something quick and simple to support a young student through a difficult time. She was very reliant on staff to support her with very little idea ways she could help herself without getting overwhelmed. Her actions suggested she needed some prompts to think of ways to ask for help.

Remembrance Day: Free SEN resources

These are the resources I have made to use with my class to support learning about Remembrance Day this November.  Poppy themed with a UK focus all use similar images and symbols . I hope they are of some use with your children.

Essential Books for Inclusive Teachers: Behaviour.

These books are only those I have read and can recommend. They all follow an inclusive and positive support ethos. They all also focus on the only part of behaviour support we can control – ourselves. If your school has a zero tolerance behaviour policy read these and make it your mission to get that rewritten.I will get around to doing a second post but I need to get reading first!

Research, Relationships and Reality.

This post will outline the role relationships play in behaviour support, I will also outline some of the research led practices I have used. Before I start I do want to say that I have read studies I do not agree with. I also know that a huge number of studies conducted ON Autistic children/adults focus on strategies intended to normalise social behaviours which is a huge ethical issue. Fortunately I have had the opportunity to listen to and discuss elements of my practice with actually Autistic academics and practitioners. This has greatly shaped my approach and ethos towards behaviour support, I will also admit this has slanted my view of a lot of studies that remove the human element from behaviour and reduce the children to purely objects to study. To this end I fully expect some of the approaches in the post and the presentation to be a bit controversial and I am 100% sure that at least some of them will contravene your school (or center’s) behaviour policy.

The Ultimate Guide to Transitions.

A Guide to supporting transitions and changes with Autistic students within school.

Transition is a challenge that our students face on a daily basis. These transitions take place on a range of scales. From the micro transition of switching thoughts between tasks to major physical transitions between environments. The number of individual transitions an individual will undertake throughout the day is huge. Each one may well be a source of stress and anxiety for each student. The level of this anxiety and how it is communicated to us will vary dramatically. As with all the actions of our students this stress may not be easy for us to interpret. The quotes are from Autistic people I asked but are anonymised. I know I do not include enough Autistic voice, I will strive to expand this in future posts (I would welcome your comments.)

What I learned from “The Reason I Jump.”

The Reason I jump Lessons learned from Noaki HIgasidas book on autism

Written by the then 13 year old Naoki Higashida an Autistic young man from Japan The reason I jump is a fascinating insight into his views on how Autism has shaped his perspective of life. The book answers a series of questions put to Noaki which he answers using an alphabet grid devised by his mother.

Why We Need To Keep Cool

This seemed apt to post now as the country simmers slowly beneath the summer sun. This post is based on observations and frequency data over a shorter period of hot weather. Whilst analysing the behavioural incident data records a spike in frequency for a specific group of 9 students was noted (the red box on

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Does Behaviour Really come “Out of the Blue?”

Looking beyond “No apparent reason”. Does Behaviour Really come “Out of the Blue?” This article is based on my experiences working with Autistic children who also communicate in ways we find challenging. We do our best to find patterns, clues and reasons for episodes of challenging behaviour. When a behaviour if displayed with no noticeable

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10 Simple Strategies to Prevent Behaviour Escalation.

Keep up to date on our facebook page These are 10 simple ways to prevent challenging behaviour escalating by making small changes to your interaction. In our PBS training these are called active interventions. In reality there are thousands of these. Add yours to the comments below! Visual supports at all times – Social stories,

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Teaching Resources: Twinkl Create

One of the most interesting things I found on the Twinkl site was the “create” feature, this allows you to build a range of resources from displays to interactive games to worksheets. Now I’m not the biggest fan of a worksheet but with a bit of laminating they can easily turn into a folder task. I hate seeing folders of random sheets that all use different fonts imagery etc. If I am creating a pack for a topic it is much better that all the resources have a common look and feel. It just looks more cohesive and planned.

Autism: Change & Transition

“If a child is Autistic, they do not like change.” This is the biggest ASD stereotype, the most widely repeated generalisation (In schools anyway). Not entirely accurate though is it? A better comment would be “Change causes anxiety.” Everyone to some degree or other is affected by change. Some change we control, volunteer for, or

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Articles for Collaboroo

I want to thank everyone who has visited Inclusiveteach.com, May has seen the most visitors ever! However I have not updated my site for a while. I have been working with a great new site for teachers called Collaboroo. Their highly visual Pinterest style site hosts a serendipitous array of creative teaching ideas and really

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Inclusive Teacher: Autism Awareness

Autism awareness is an essential concept with ever increasing need for us all to seek a greater understanding of what it means to be autistic. However it must be more than holding an assembly, or watching a video. We must make real and ongoing adaptations to ensure our learning environments and school communities are as inclusive as possible.

Inclusive Teacher: Hero Cards & Rules

Social stories are a tried and tested way of teaching social skills but for some learners they are too much. I needed a way to remind a student of the rules but in a way that didn’t single them out as being the focus of the story. Some people will say this won’t work as autistic children can’t generalise…. but anyone who has worked with autism knows a lot of what people say is actually a myth or just does not apply to an individual.

Inclusive Teacher: Using Lego!

What better way to celebrate the second birthday of Inclusiveteach.com than with a post about Lego! My Favourite subject, also was the focus of most of my tweets all those years ago! Anyway Lego is one of the most easily adaptable resources a teacher can have no matter what the needs of their class. Yes

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