Category: inclusion

There comes a time: The crisis facing our most vulnerable children.

There are many many children out there who are crying out for help. There are many dedicated, enthusiastic, creative and compassionate people who are desperate to help. These people need help, we are increasingly facing highly complex issues that very few educational professionals are equipped to deal with. I am writing this as a teacher but I know there are CAMHS workers, social workers and support staff throughout the country who are feeling like this.

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Creating an inclusive recruitment process.

If you have a recruitment crisis in your sector you work to encourage people to join that industry not make excuses for why the barriers exist.

Remembrance Day: Free SEN resources

These are the resources I have made to use with my class to support learning about Remembrance Day this November.  Poppy themed with a UK focus all use similar images and symbols . I hope they are of some use with your children.

Research, Relationships and Reality.

This post will outline the role relationships play in behaviour support, I will also outline some of the research led practices I have used. Before I start I do want to say that I have read studies I do not agree with. I also know that a huge number of studies conducted ON Autistic children/adults focus on strategies intended to normalise social behaviours which is a huge ethical issue. Fortunately I have had the opportunity to listen to and discuss elements of my practice with actually Autistic academics and practitioners. This has greatly shaped my approach and ethos towards behaviour support, I will also admit this has slanted my view of a lot of studies that remove the human element from behaviour and reduce the children to purely objects to study. To this end I fully expect some of the approaches in the post and the presentation to be a bit controversial and I am 100% sure that at least some of them will contravene your school (or center’s) behaviour policy.

The Ultimate Guide to Transitions.

A Guide to supporting transitions and changes with Autistic students within school.

Transition is a challenge that our students face on a daily basis. These transitions take place on a range of scales. From the micro transition of switching thoughts between tasks to major physical transitions between environments. The number of individual transitions an individual will undertake throughout the day is huge. Each one may well be a source of stress and anxiety for each student. The level of this anxiety and how it is communicated to us will vary dramatically. As with all the actions of our students this stress may not be easy for us to interpret. The quotes are from Autistic people I asked but are anonymised. I know I do not include enough Autistic voice, I will strive to expand this in future posts (I would welcome your comments.)

What I learned from “The Reason I Jump.”

The Reason I jump Lessons learned from Noaki HIgasidas book on autism

Written by the then 13 year old Naoki Higashida an Autistic young man from Japan The reason I jump is a fascinating insight into his views on how Autism has shaped his perspective of life. The book answers a series of questions put to Noaki which he answers using an alphabet grid devised by his mother.

Autism: Change & Transition

“If a child is Autistic, they do not like change.” This is the biggest ASD stereotype, the most widely repeated generalisation (In schools anyway). Not entirely accurate though is it? A better comment would be “Change causes anxiety.” Everyone to some degree or other is affected by change. Some change we control, volunteer for, or

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6 Essential De-escalation Tips

Every day teachers, parents and carers are faced with potentially challenging situations. Many of these are defused through skillful behaviour support. These successful resolutions will have certain common characteristics. There are some essential conditions that must exist to deescalate an incident of challenging behaviour. If these don’t exist the only result is a child in

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Inclusive Teacher: Autism Awareness

Autism awareness is an essential concept with ever increasing need for us all to seek a greater understanding of what it means to be autistic. However it must be more than holding an assembly, or watching a video. We must make real and ongoing adaptations to ensure our learning environments and school communities are as inclusive as possible.

Inclusive Teacher: Hero Cards & Rules

Social stories are a tried and tested way of teaching social skills but for some learners they are too much. I needed a way to remind a student of the rules but in a way that didn’t single them out as being the focus of the story. Some people will say this won’t work as autistic children can’t generalise…. but anyone who has worked with autism knows a lot of what people say is actually a myth or just does not apply to an individual.

Inclusive Teacher: Using Lego!

What better way to celebrate the second birthday of Inclusiveteach.com than with a post about Lego! My Favourite subject, also was the focus of most of my tweets all those years ago! Anyway Lego is one of the most easily adaptable resources a teacher can have no matter what the needs of their class. Yes

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Using Videos to Boost Engagement.

On Youtube you can probably find a video that will link in with your lesson no matter what it is. These can be really effective teaching tools or a time filler. If needed you can use a “safe” version of youtube (Safetube) to remove the links, comments, and buttons that do quite often link to

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5 questions about Sensory Processing #behaviourchat

5 Questions about Sensory Processing disorder SPD

n my role as behaviour lead at my school I am increasingly interested in the impact of sensory processing on learning, engagement and what we perceive as challenging behaviour. I wanted to find out more so asked some questions of the twitterverse. This is a breakdown of some of the things I was able to take away from the chat.

10 reasons why NQTs should consider working in specialist provision.

If you have recently qualified and looking for a teaching post I would urge you to consider working in a specialist provision, whether that be a PRU, special school, specialist unit or residential school. Why I hear you ask? Well here are 10 reasons to start off with It will immerse you in an environment

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Autism: Facial Expressions.

This blog was prompted after I read this research paper. When you are a teacher of children diagnosed with ASD, you have a job to do, you are in a position with responsibility to carry out a task. How often do we question our ability to do this? I don’t mean write a lesson plan.

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Behaviour: Tips for Managing your emotions.

Behaviour: Tips for Controlling your emotions.

Part of my current role involves training the new PBS instructors for the county special schools. This is a great opportunity to ensure a consistent approach between schools but also to learn from and share experiences with a range of really positive and passionate educators from across Kent. One of the benefits of conducting training

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Challenging Behaviour: 5 reasons your strategies aren’t working.

When faced with displays of behaviour that challenge most schools resort to sanctions and consequences. For some this may work.  If you work with Young people with a special educational need, mental health issues, or those experiencing that most troubling of all childhood issues – Puberty; need you to raise your game and think beyond

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Excellent SEN Blogs to follow: Part 2.

This is a follow up to part 1 there are a huge number of great SEN blogs with ideas, resources, and inspiration  for you to read and engage with. These are just some I have enjoyed reading and wanted to share them with you. Tracey Lawrence – Tweets as @behaviourteach Assistant head, and host of

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Teaching with TEACCH: Autism

One of the main issues I have with labels is the group children with a huge array of skills, interests, talents together and that leads to approaches to their education that try to suggest it will work with anyone who has that label. I have used the TEACCH approach widely but never with the whole

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Transitions and Barriers: The Environment

Autism can create barriers, we as teachers can also unwittingly create barriers. We must take a moment to consider our actions and decisions in terms of how they may create issues for those we are responsible for educating. The environment is also a source of barriers for some of our students. Audio Narration here: A

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